Books I Could Re-read Forever

Back in 2016 the pressure to think up startlingly original reviews/bookish posts finally got the better of me and I gave in – albeit temporarily. Life happened and what has followed has been quite a simple epiphany – it doesn’t fudging matter if my posts are any good as long as I’m enjoying myself! It has been all to easy too forget just how fantastic the online bookish community is and the past couple of weeks I’ve spent reconnecting with people have been just wonderful and reminded me just how much I’ve missed everyone.

I always enjoy writing reviews but, if I’m honest, anything beyond that (unless I have a clear subject matter; e.g. a bookshop I’ve visited, etc) I sometimes struggle for inspiration and I have so much admiration for those who churn out quality post after post. That’s why I’ve always enjoyed the eternally popular Top Ten Tuesday (originally hosted by Jamie at The Broke and the Bookish who has since moved on and has now courageously been taken on by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl) for a little mental jig around and inspiration (which if any of you have seen my woeful Goodreads so far this year will understand is sorely needed). Today I’m starting on a positive note and looking at the books I could reread forever (but never do since rereading feels like time-wasting – I know that that’s the wrong attitude to have – feel free to tell me how wrong in the comments section below!):

1. Gone with the Wind – Margaret Mitchell 


Now, because of when/where it is set (i.e. Civil War era Georgia) Gone With the Wind can make you squirm; specifically with its depiction of slavery – oh how content they seem! However, regardless of these sinister misgivings, this is a CRACKER of a story and I could read it all. day. long.

2. Snowflake – Paul Gallico


I’m sure I’ve mentioned this book on here a million times, no doubt in lists identical to this one but do give it a read. It’s not a terribly well-known book these days but it is oh so sweet and ever so magical. Read it before the snow disappears!

3. His Dark Material Trilogy – Philip Pullman


It’s so many years now since I read Philip Pullman’s legendary trilogy, I’ve definitely passed my 10 year rule on re-reads. It’s time to dust these off again because the fantastical adventures of Lyra and her Pantalaimon have never left me.

4. The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood


Does this one need any explanation? I unfortunately didn’t make it very far into the popular TV adaptation last year (I couldn’t cope with my OH spoiling it for himself) but a million and one people have told me I need to give it another crack.

5. The Snowchild – Eowyn Ivey


Another beautiful novel. Rich with imagery and meaning. This modern fairytale reminds me in this lull that there are wonderful books out there, I just need to search a little harder (and read a little more thoughtfully).

6. The Snowgoose – Paul Gallico


Another beautiful, fable-like tale from one of my all time faves (I’m sure those of you who have been around here a while are familiar with my twee Paul Gallico obsession – sorry). The Snow Goose is arguably his most famous work.

7. I Capture the Castle – Dodie Smith


I often get myself into a mood where I relish eccentric, quintessentially English books that don’t need to necessarily go anywhere plot-wise, they just need to be beautifully written. This is a book for all your lazy summer afternoons.

8. All My Friends are Superheroes – Andrew Kaufman


After reading his fantastical fable; The Tiny Wife, I was so excited to return to Andrew Kaufman’s famous first book. It is funny, quirky in the extreme, touching and can be read on so many different levels. It definitely needs to be read more than the once.

9. Cider with Rosie – Laurie Lee


Ooooo Laurie Lee. More quintessential ‘englishness’ (the original, in my opinion). Although the Spanish novels recounting his time there during the civil war are wonderful, I adore Cider with Rosie. It’s idyllic picture of rural England makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside. I just can’t help myself.

10. We Should All Be Feminists – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie


Adichie is not only an immensely talented novelist but an awesome woman, an intellectual force to be reckoned with and this tract; based on her 2013 TEDx talk, is food for thought. You have no excuse not to improve yourself by reading this again and again; it’s oh so short and oh so important.

8 thoughts on “Books I Could Re-read Forever

  1. It’s great to have you back blogging regularly. Posts can be about whatever you like, whenever you like! I have still not managed to read any Gallico — I remember you recommending him in the past — though either of the ones you mention would seem perfect for this time of year.

    You might like The Reading Cure by Laura Freeman; she includes lots of cosy English stuff 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ah thanks Rebecca 🙂 Yeah I love Gallico, I’m just a sucker for just a nice, sweet, simple story! All the better if it revolves around cats. If you ever fancy him I would definitely recommend starting with Jennie – about a little boy who turns into a cat. It’s wonderful.


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